• all original

    From JIMMY ANDERSON@VERT/OTHETA to MOONDOG on Mon Jun 1 12:26:00 2020
    MOONDOG wrote to GAMGEE <=-

    Having an "all original" firearm that seen action isn't realistic.
    Pins go bad or fall out, springs get worn, barrels get shot out, and receivers and stocks sometimes crack.

    Very true! So far, my Belgium Browning SA-22 is all original as far as
    parts, but it has been refinished with Cerakote, which is, of course, not permanant if I want to remove it.

    But so far - knock on wood - all the internal parts are the same!




    ... Jokes about German sausage are the wurst.
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    wcQWK 8.0 Omicron Theta * Memphis, TN * winserver.org
  • From Moondog@VERT/CAVEBBS to JIMMY ANDERSON on Tue Jun 2 11:16:00 2020
    Re: all original
    By: JIMMY ANDERSON to MOONDOG on Mon Jun 01 2020 12:26 pm

    MOONDOG wrote to GAMGEE <=-

    Having an "all original" firearm that seen action isn't realistic.
    Pins go bad or fall out, springs get worn, barrels get shot out, and receivers and stocks sometimes crack.

    Very true! So far, my Belgium Browning SA-22 is all original as far as parts, but it has been refinished with Cerakote, which is, of course, not permanant if I want to remove it.

    But so far - knock on wood - all the internal parts are the same!




    ... Jokes about German sausage are the wurst.

    My father was trained to be a machinist in the Army back in the early 1960's.
    He was stationed in Germany, and assigned to work in a repair shop. The armorers would perform triage on firearms coming into the shop, then send the parts to machinists with a description of services to be performed. He said the most common problem was roll pins would eventually wear down from
    constant insertion and removal during cleaning, and the armorer's cure was tapping threads in the pin holes and replacing the pins with screws. He said some of the older armorers were really sharp, and would secretly build theirselves up competion grade 1911's. They would tighten up the slides with
    a vise, then polish and stone all the contact surfacee and adjusted trggers. There were regualr inspections and suspicion that some guns were not being documented or destroyed as claimed, however the smiths would be in a constant game of hiding things.

    ---
    Synchronet The Cave BBS - Since 1992 - cavebbs.homeip.net
  • From JIMMY ANDERSON@VERT/OTHETA to MOONDOG on Tue Jun 2 07:41:00 2020
    MOONDOG wrote to JIMMY ANDERSON <=-

    My father was trained to be a machinist in the Army back in the early 1960's.
    He was stationed in Germany, and assigned to work in a repair shop.
    The armorers would perform triage on firearms coming into the shop,
    then send the parts to machinists with a description of services to be performed. He said the most common problem was roll pins would
    eventually wear down from constant insertion and removal during
    cleaning, and the armorer's cure was tapping threads in the pin holes
    and replacing the pins with screws. He said some of the older armorers were really sharp, and would secretly build theirselves up competion
    grade 1911's. They would tighten up the slides with a vise, then
    polish and stone all the contact surfacee and adjusted trggers. There
    were regualr inspections and suspicion that some guns were not being documented or destroyed as claimed, however the smiths would be in a constant game of hiding things.

    LOL - that's funny, and totally believable! Love hearing stuff like that!




    ... Hey, look! A completely new undocumented fea&%$#*@ NO CARRIER
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