• Helen OS

    From Deavmi@VERT/USERCLUB to All on Sun Aug 20 06:13:31 2017
    Anyone here heard of Helen OS (it's not UNIX-based by the way).

    It is a research OS i guess.

    Pretty nice user interface though.

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  • From Deavmi@VERT/USERCLUB to Deavmi on Sun Aug 20 06:53:34 2017
    Anyone here heard of Helen OS (it's not UNIX-based by the way).

    It is a research OS i guess.

    Pretty nice user interface though.

    Also the utilities it comes with are pretty cool. I must say.


    Here is a link to their site: http://www.helenos.org/

    ---
    Synchronet UsersClub BBS - userclub-bbs.com
  • From KK4QBN@VERT/KK4QBN to Deavmi on Tue Aug 22 16:30:43 2017
    Re: Helen OS
    By: Deavmi to All on Sun Aug 20 2017 06:13:31

    Anyone here heard of Helen OS (it's not UNIX-based by the way).

    It is a research OS i guess.

    Pretty nice user interface though.

    huh.. new one on me..

    --

    Tim Smith (KK4QBN)
    KK4QBN BBS

    ---
    * Synchronet * KK4QBN - kk4qbn.synchro.net - 7064229538 - Chatsworth GA USA
  • From anthk@VERT to Deavmi on Mon Oct 5 17:14:46 2020
    Re: Re: Helen OS
    By: Deavmi to Deavmi on Sun Aug 20 2017 06:53 am

    This is an interesting os to try under a RaspBerry Pi,
    altough if it had an audio player and a ssh/telnet client
    plus a supported wireless driver, it would be enough
    for my dailt tasks. Altough today a lot can be done
    with a Wifi232 and a FPGA implemented retro machine.
    ---
    Synchronet Vertrauen Home of Synchronet [vert/cvs/bbs].synchro.net
  • From Warp 4@VERT/WILDCAT to anthk on Thu Oct 8 08:58:03 2020
    On 10/5/2020 12:14 PM, anthk wrote:

    This is an interesting os to try under a RaspBerry Pi,
    altough if it had an audio player and a ssh/telnet client
    plus a supported wireless driver, it would be enough
    for my dailt tasks. Altough today a lot can be done
    with a Wifi232 and a FPGA implemented retro machine.

    I prefer Raspbian myself.

    ---
    Synchronet Omicron Theta/Linxu * Southaven MS * linux.winserver.org
  • From Mortifis@VERT/EPHRAM to Warp 4 on Sat Oct 10 16:52:44 2020
    On 10/5/2020 12:14 PM, anthk wrote:

    This is an interesting os to try under a RaspBerry Pi,
    altough if it had an audio player and a ssh/telnet client
    plus a supported wireless driver, it would be enough
    for my dailt tasks. Altough today a lot can be done
    with a Wifi232 and a FPGA implemented retro machine.

    I prefer Raspbian myself.

    ya, I figure if one has an rpi they might as well use raspbian os ... hell, I even use raspbian pc on my x86_64 :-o

    ~Mortifis

    ---
    Synchronet The Realm of Dispair telnet ephram.synchro.net 2323 ssh 2222 web 82
  • From paulie420@VERT/BEERS20 to Mortifis on Sun Oct 11 12:00:00 2020
    This is an interesting os to try under a RaspBerry Pi,
    altough if it had an audio player and a ssh/telnet client
    plus a supported wireless driver, it would be enough
    for my dailt tasks. Altough today a lot can be done
    with a Wifi232 and a FPGA implemented retro machine.

    I prefer Raspbian myself.

    ya, I figure if one has an rpi they might as well use raspbian os ... hell, I even use raspbian pc on my x86_64 :-o

    ~Mortifis

    I use Raspberry Pi's for many things around my home network. I haven't seen
    or tried HelenOS; but it seems like theres many new, niche OSes popping up
    for RPi's that... IMO aren't very worthy; however I don't know HelenOS.

    Raspian is always the best for building something specific you need; whether you use the GUI or lite version.

    If you're into retro gaming, or are coming from x86 systems and aren't
    wanting to embrace the ARM side, I would REALLY suggest TwisterOS. It is an
    OS built with the end goal of making box86 (x86 emulator for ARM systems) better on the Raspberry Pi...

    So, sorry to hijack the thread BUT for RPi's I really would suggest:

    Raspian/Raspberry Pi OS - If you're trying to embrace/learn/build on the ARM platform..

    TwisterOS - If you're into retro gaming, or less interested in ARM stuff...
    it has x86 support right on your RPi.

    ---
    I haven't played with DietPi... which might be nice for specific Pi Zero builds... does anyone suggest it to built things from the ground up with only the stuff you need?



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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to paulie420 on Mon Oct 12 06:35:00 2020
    paulie420 wrote to Mortifis <=-

    I use Raspberry Pi's for many things around my home network. I haven't seen or tried HelenOS; but it seems like theres many new, niche OSes popping up for RPi's that... IMO aren't very worthy; however I don't
    know HelenOS.


    For around the price of a rPi, I bought a used thinkpad with a broken
    keyboard, maxxed the RAM out and loaded Proxmox on it. I'm running
    PiHole on it, as well as several other OSes. It sits folded up under
    my router, making a compact little homelab.

    I hear there's a rPi version of ESXi, with enough memory it might
    make more sense to run bare metal virtualization - then you could run
    whatever OS you want?




    ... Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.
    --- MultiMail/XT v0.52
    Synchronet realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From paulie420@VERT/BEERS20 to poindexter FORTRAN on Mon Oct 12 11:23:00 2020
    For around the price of a rPi, I bought a used thinkpad with a broken
    keyboard, maxxed the RAM out and loaded Proxmox on it. I'm running
    PiHole on it, as well as several other OSes. It sits folded up under
    my router, making a compact little homelab.

    You know, I do own one 27" power iMac - and it does all the 'pretty' things I like to do around the house; but it doesn't really RUN any of my tasks/servers/etc... it just comsumes and displays data in a great looking package.

    I actually also bought several ThinkPad T430s machines, specced them out like you described... and I even upgrade the monitors to a 1920x1080 full ips display - I have to order this connector from china, but I haven't had any issues with them; some others have had the display do funny stuff but... I've been lucky. For ME, the i7-3520 processors my ThinkPads have handles most any Linux stuff I need them to do. I *love* the ThinkPad platform... and probably will buy a current model at some point... a T480 or something like that.

    I hear there's a rPi version of ESXi, with enough memory it might
    make more sense to run bare metal virtualization - then you could run
    whatever OS you want?

    I'm not familiar with ESXi or proxmox; although I have heard of proxmox
    before, I don't exactly know what tasks it performs of why I might need it.
    :P Lol.

    I'll research both of those... thanks for your reply.



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  • From anthk@VERT to paulie420 on Mon Oct 12 14:34:28 2020
    Re: Re: Helen OS
    By: paulie420 to Mortifis on Sun Oct 11 2020 12:00 pm

    Alpine Linux would be better suited than raspbian or dietpi, specially
    on setups with high I/O writting, as Alpine allows to run from RAM
    and just write the differences with 'lbu commit -d',
    saving a lot of writting cycles on an SD.
    ---
    Synchronet Vertrauen Home of Synchronet [vert/cvs/bbs].synchro.net
  • From Moondog@VERT/CAVEBBS to poindexter FORTRAN on Mon Oct 12 18:02:00 2020
    Re: Re: Helen OS
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to paulie420 on Mon Oct 12 2020 06:35 am

    paulie420 wrote to Mortifis <=-

    I use Raspberry Pi's for many things around my home network. I haven't seen or tried HelenOS; but it seems like theres many new, niche OSes popping up for RPi's that... IMO aren't very worthy; however I don't know HelenOS.


    For around the price of a rPi, I bought a used thinkpad with a broken
    keyboard, maxxed the RAM out and loaded Proxmox on it. I'm running
    PiHole on it, as well as several other OSes. It sits folded up under
    my router, making a compact little homelab.

    I hear there's a rPi version of ESXi, with enough memory it might
    make more sense to run bare metal virtualization - then you could run
    whatever OS you want?




    ... Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.

    Another used hardware alternative is getting used thni clients from ebay or other liquidators. They are powerful enough to be used as netowrk
    appliances or other light duty applicaitons.

    ---
    Synchronet The Cave BBS - Since 1992 - cavebbs.homeip.net
  • From paulie420@VERT/BEERS20 to anthk on Mon Oct 12 21:34:00 2020
    Alpine Linux would be better suited than raspbian or dietpi, specially
    on setups with high I/O writting, as Alpine allows to run from RAM
    and just write the differences with 'lbu commit -d',
    saving a lot of writting cycles on an SD.

    Hmmm.. I've played with Alpine in the past; but just in a very distro hoppy way; I didn't utilize that RAM feature. Many things I create with Pi's are
    read only systems tho... so once all my data is on the SDcard, thats it no in or out at all...

    I think raspian (or diet) is good for that.



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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to paulie420 on Tue Oct 13 07:23:00 2020
    paulie420 wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    I actually also bought several ThinkPad T430s machines, specced them
    out like you described... and I even upgrade the monitors to a
    1920x1080 full ips display - I have to order this connector from china, but I haven't had any issues with them; some others have had the
    display do funny stuff but... I've been lucky. For ME, the i7-3520 processors my ThinkPads have handles most any Linux stuff I need them
    to do. I *love* the ThinkPad platform... and probably will buy a
    current model at some point... a T480 or something like that.

    I can't seem to get rid of my T410; it's a boat anchor compared to
    the newer models, but I love the keyboard. It's got an i7, the only
    real issue is that it maxxes out at 8 GB of RAM. I'd love it if I
    could get it up to 16.

    I have a 16gb T480 from work, they are nice systems.

    I hear there's a rPi version of ESXi, with enough memory it might
    make more sense to run bare metal virtualization - then you could run
    whatever OS you want?

    I'm not familiar with ESXi or proxmox; although I have heard of proxmox before, I don't exactly know what tasks it performs of why I might need it. :P Lol.

    ESXi and Proxmox are bare metal virtualization platforms. ESXi is
    from VMware and free for home use, Proxmox has a community edition
    and a paid support, enterprise edition. Both boot up on bare hardware
    and let you run virtual machines without needing the overhead of a
    full OS like running VirtualBox or VMware Workstation/Player on
    Windows or Linux.


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    ... Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.
    --- MultiMail/XT v0.52
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Moondog on Tue Oct 13 07:24:00 2020
    Moondog wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    Another used hardware alternative is getting used thni clients from
    ebay or other liquidators. They are powerful enough to be used as
    netowrk appliances or other light duty applicaitons.

    I've wanted to buy one of those thin clients to be a DOS gaming box.
    I've heard of people using them as low-powered hosts to run MagicJack
    from, too.



    ... Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.
    --- MultiMail/XT v0.52
    Synchronet realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From paulie420@VERT/BEERS20 to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 13 20:20:00 2020
    I actually also bought several ThinkPad T430s machines, specced them out like you described... and I even upgrade the monitors to a 1920x1080 full ips display - I have to order this connector from chin but I haven't had any issues with them; some others have had the display do funny stuff but... I've been lucky. For ME, the i7-3520 processors my ThinkPads have handles most any Linux stuff I need them to do. I *love* the ThinkPad platform... and probably will buy a current model at some point... a T480 or something like that.

    I can't seem to get rid of my T410; it's a boat anchor compared to
    the newer models, but I love the keyboard. It's got an i7, the only
    real issue is that it maxxes out at 8 GB of RAM. I'd love it if I
    could get it up to 16.

    I have a 16gb T480 from work, they are nice systems.


    The T430s does go to 16gb ram, so I guess thats one reason why I can still
    use it as an almost-daily driver...

    The T430s has an i7, too... but I wish I had the T430 so it was socketed and
    I could even push IT up a bit too...

    The T440 is even better, and I guess if I was buying CURRENTLY I'd go for a current T480... what CURRENT ThinkPad do you think is worthy of a purchase?



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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to paulie420 on Thu Oct 15 08:35:00 2020
    paulie420 wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    The T440 is even better, and I guess if I was buying CURRENTLY I'd go
    for a current T480... what CURRENT ThinkPad do you think is worthy of a purchase?

    The T480s is a hell of a laptop, but I'm thinking about a Dell, for a
    simple reason - now that I'm working from home, I work out on my deck
    a lot, do a lot of video calls with it, and a black laptop gets hot fast!

    Odd, since I worked for a company that was all Thinkpad - T43, X60,
    T60 and Z60s. Company was acquired by a company that was all Dell,
    and we suffered through the D610/620/630, the super lightweight model
    that could barely boot, then the E4300, E6300, then finally getting
    good when I left, with the E7430s. Hated them all, except a E6330
    that I modded up with more memory, a hybrid drive and a DVD burner.
    That was an awesome remote work laptop - I never sat at the same desk
    twice when I had that thing.




    ... Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.
    --- MultiMail/XT v0.52
    Synchronet realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From paulie420@VERT/BEERS20 to poindexter FORTRAN on Sat Oct 17 13:05:00 2020
    The T480s is a hell of a laptop, but I'm thinking about a Dell, for a
    simple reason - now that I'm working from home, I work out on my deck
    a lot, do a lot of video calls with it, and a black laptop gets hot
    fast!

    I really like the Dell XPS line; and they even have a developer version
    running some form of linux; its pretty cheap even.

    I assume that the Dell lines are fairly linux-compatible... hmmmmm.



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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to paulie420 on Sun Oct 18 07:18:00 2020
    paulie420 wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    I really like the Dell XPS line; and they even have a developer version running some form of linux; its pretty cheap even.

    I had one of the original XPS13 Developer editions (l321x), and it ran
    Ubuntu flawlessly. I built a developer image on it for a couple of
    dozen engineers at a former company and they loved them.



    ... Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.
    --- MultiMail/XT v0.52
    Synchronet realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From paulie420@VERT/BEERS20 to poindexter FORTRAN on Sun Oct 18 20:55:00 2020
    I had one of the original XPS13 Developer editions (l321x), and it ran Ubuntu flawlessly. I built a developer image on it for a couple of
    dozen engineers at a former company and they loved them.

    Might be a dumb question, but to create an image for install on other
    machines later - do I just install an OS, install all packages I want
    included and then backup the entire drive to an IMG?



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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to paulie420 on Mon Oct 19 07:21:00 2020
    paulie420 wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    I had one of the original XPS13 Developer editions (l321x), and it ran Ubuntu flawlessly. I built a developer image on it for a couple of
    dozen engineers at a former company and they loved them.

    Might be a dumb question, but to create an image for install on other machines later - do I just install an OS, install all packages I want included and then backup the entire drive to an IMG?

    Essentially, yes.




    ... Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.
    --- MultiMail/XT v0.52
    Synchronet realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From paulie420@VERT/BEERS20 to poindexter FORTRAN on Mon Oct 19 22:31:00 2020
    Might be a dumb question, but to create an image for install on other machines later - do I just install an OS, install all packages I want included and then backup the entire drive to an IMG?

    Essentially, yes.

    I want to setup my favorite linux OS, add my base stuff I use and keep that image for install on other laptops - so I don't have to reinstall everything. Just update/upgrade and go.



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